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Cambridge Global Food Security

An Interdisciplinary Research Centre at the University of Cambridge
 
Read more at: Shellfish can feed one billion people in the developing world

Shellfish can feed one billion people in the developing world

15 July 2020

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have been carrying out pioneering research on the potential of bivalve shellfish (mussels, clams, and oysters) as a nutritious and low-impact food source. New innovations in how we produce bivalves could fulfil the protein needs of nearly one billion people in the most vulnerable...

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Read more at: How can we build resilient food systems for the future?

How can we build resilient food systems for the future?

2 July 2020

COVID-19 has shown the fragilities of our food systems, challenging business to adapt and showing the importance of local communities. How can we build and maintain a resilient food system? This webinar, held on 29 June 2020, was hosted by Dr Jag Srai, Co-Chair of the Cambridge Global Food Security IRC. Speakers included...

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Meet Chioma Achi

11 June 2020

With the support of the Cambridge Global Food Security Early Career Researcher Travel Fund, veterinarian and PhD student Chioma Achi conducted field research on antimicrobial resistance in Nigeria in January and February 2020. She visited farms and selected slaughterhouses, and conducted interviews to gather her data. Find out how she had to combine her scientific planning with good time management and communication skills in order to complete her project.

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COVID-19 impact on zoonotic disease risk solutions in displaced populations

22 May 2020

While walking through the mud among the improvised tented shelters of an informal camp housing Syrian refugees in Jordan, I was approached by a desperate mother and her young disabled son. Amina showed me a hand-written prescription of the medication she needed but had been unable to obtain, after losing access to medical assistance. As the war in Syria drags on, humanitarian actors have shifted from emergency response towards longer term development aid, affecting the assistance available to people living outside formal refugee camps.

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Covid-19 and agriculture: the coming contradictory hunger pandemic

19 May 2020

To conceptualize agriculture as a way of catering to the needs of the many, while protecting what is left of nature, will be a major task for all future politics.

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COVID-19 impacts on food security: an opportunity to address old problems?

14 May 2020

By 2050 the global population is expected to increase up to 9.8 billion people (UNDESA, 2017). Accordingly, food production will have to increase by 60 percent for food requirements to be met (FAO, 2015). This poses a big challenge for food systems as they have to achieve this sustainably. With the global scenario having changed drastically due to the COVID-19 pandemic, these already existing food security concerns have been heightened. The pandemic threatens to add to the 820 million people living in chronic hunger, as the measures adopted to stop the spread can hinder food production as well as people’s ability to purchase food.

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Professor Ottoline Leyser DBE FRS elected as Regius Professor of Botany

14 May 2020

Professor Dame Ottoline Leyser DBE FRS has been elected as Regius Professor of Botany and she will take up the post in October 2020. Her role as Director of the Sainsbury Laboratory will be taken over by Prof Henrik Jönsson.

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Food insecurity in the UK – why we need a new normal

5 May 2020

Headlines on ‘Food Bank Britain’ have featured increasingly in our newspapers since the global financial crash in 2008, documenting the struggle of many people who rely on emergency food aid to feed themselves and their families.

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Local food solutions during the coronavirus crisis could have lasting benefits

23 April 2020

A decade ago, food security in developing countries was regarded as a major challenge. The growing food insecurity in the poorest countries was seen a trigger for large scale migration to richer countries, where it threatened human security. It was argued that humanitarian assistance to the poorest countries - through food aid - was necessary to prevent a descent into violence and protracted conflict in the face of poor institutional capacity.

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Finger millet from trials investigating response to contrasting fertiliser rates.

Meet Nick Fradgley

20 April 2020

PhD student Nick Fradgley travelled to Ethiopia in 2019, with the support of the Cambridge Global Food Security Early Career Researcher Travel Fund, to conduct research on how teff, sorghum, finger millet, and durum wheat are bred. Find out how he planned his trip, what he learned, and how this has broadened his views on the complex issues that surround food security in Ethiopia.

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Cambridge University Research News on Food Security